Saturday, February 9, 2013

Frederick Childe Hassam


Church Procession, Spanish Steps, 1883


Horticultural Building, World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893


Promenade at Sunset, Paris (1888-1889)

Champs Elysées, Paris - Oil on canvas, 1889


A New York blizzard (1890)


Poppies on the Isles of Shoals, 1890
National Gallery of Art, Washington


Rainy Midnight, (1890s)


The Evening Star (1891)


Nocturne, Railway Crossing, Chicago (1893)


Winter Midnight, 1894


Late Afternoon, New York, Winter (1900)


Frederick Childe Hassam - Winter Afternoon in New York, 1900

One of Hassam’s more typically impressionistic works, this painting gives the viewer a pretty, appealing view of a New York street filtered through a sparkling winter storm. By this point, Impressionism was not considered radical; artists could go to schools set up to teach an impressionistic style of painting (such as William Merritt Chase’s summer art school in Shinnecock, Long Island), and it was becoming widely accepted as an academic style.



September Moonrise, 1900


Sand Springs Butte, 1904


October Haze, Manhattan, 1910


Sunset, Old Lyme, Connecticut (1911)
watercolor over pencil on paper 23.5 x 29.85 cm


The Silver Veil and the Golden Gate 1914



Mt. Beacon at Newburgh, 1916




The Fourth of July, 1916



Allies-Day May (1917)


Winter, Midnight



Gate of the Alhambra



The Avenue in the Rain


Moonlight


Nocturne, Hyde Park Corner



Apple Trees in Bloom, Old Lyme


Garden by the Sea, Isles of Shoals



Rainy Day on Fifth Avenue


The Silver Veil and the Golden Gate

Frederick Childe Hassam (October 17, 1859 – August 27, 1935) was a prolific American Impressionist painter, noted for his urban and coastal scenes. Along with Mary Cassatt and John Henry Twachtman, Hassam was instrumental in promulgating Impressionism to American collectors, dealers, and museums. He produced over 3,000 paintings, watercolors, etchings, and lithographs over the course of his career, and was an influential American artist of the early 20th century.
source: wikipedia